Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 29th International Conference on Vaccines and Immunization London, UK.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Pierre A MORGON photo
Biography:

Pierre A Morgon is Chief Executive Officer of MRGN Advisors, a consultancy dedicated to the healthcare sector, and Regional Partner for Switzerland at Mérieux Développement, an evergreen investment structure focused on medical devices, in vitro diagnostics and patient management services. He is also Chairman of the Board of Virometix (developing proprietary synthetic nanoparticle platform in vaccines and immunotherapeutic drugs for viral diseases and cancer), Non-Executive Director to the Board of Theradiag (focusing on in vitro diagnostics in auto-immunity, infectious diseases and allergy) and Non-Executive Director to the Board of Eurocine Vaccines (developing intra nasal vaccines). He holds a Doctorate of Pharmacy, Master degree in Business Law and MBA.

 

Abstract:

The vaccine segment is anticipated to be one of the fastest growing one of the healthcare industry and several leading firms have stepped up vaccine investments in recent years. Unlike therapeutic agents, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals only once or very infrequently during a life time. Vaccines generate well-documented positive externalities, yet their poor awareness and acceptability among vaccine end-users may contribute to resurgence of transmissible diseases and consequently trigger governmental interventions such as mandating vaccination. In addition to technical and clinical development per the highest quality standards, bringing new vaccines to market requires carefully orchestrated programs targeting the multiple types of stakeholders along the entire value chain and addressing their respective purchasing behavioral drivers. Against a backdrop of anti-vaccination buzz and vaccine fatigue, successful global launch and sustainable usage of a vaccine requires the development of a multi-pronged strategy addressing all aspects in relation to acceptability (e.g. the motivation to immunize despite the quasi-disappearance of the disease), accessibility (e.g. supply chain services), availability (e.g. mechanisms ensuring reliability of supply) and affordability (e.g. tiered pricing policy taking country differences in per capita income into account). Leveraging novel technological advances can positively influence the ability to activate these levers successfully.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 10:50 -11:10 @ Breakout Area

Keynote Forum

Poupak Fallahi

University of Pisa, Italy

Keynote: Vaccines and type 1 diabetes

Time : 11.10-11.50

OMICS International Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Poupak Fallahi photo
Biography:

Poupak Fallahi completed her Graduation in Medicine and Surgery in 1993 and specialized in Occupational Health Medicine in 1999 at University of Pisa, Italy. Her principal areas of expertise are autoimmune thyroid disorders, type 1 diabetes, chemokines and cytokines, systemic autoimmune disorders, HCV-associated thyroid disorders, thyroid cancer and occupational medicine. Her researches have been published in more than 218 articles on international journals (HI=47). She serves as an Editorial Board Member and is Referee and Reviewer of many scientifi c international journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In predisposed subjects autoimmune reactions to vaccines can rarely be induced by molecular mimicry or bystander activation mechanisms. Th e pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is complex and derives from a combination of
genetic, hormonal, immunological, and environmental factors, and viruses seem to have a determinant role among the diff erent environmental factors.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The literature about the possible association between vaccines and T1D in humans has been reviewed.
 
Findings: The available data do not support an association between vaccines and T1D both in young adults, or children. However, evidence about this association are incomplete and not clear as several factors appear to be involved in the development of T1D. Several experimental data have suggested that vaccines could exert a protecting or aggravating effect on the occurrence of diabetes, regarding on the timing of vaccination. In adults, a study conducted in active component US military personnel did not observe a signifi cant increased
risk of T1D aft er vaccination with anthrax vaccine adsorbed, smallpox vaccine, typhoid vaccine, Hepatitis B vaccine, Measles Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, or Yellow fever vaccine. Well-designed and long-term studies about the use of vaccines and incidence of childhood diabetes are ongoing.
 
Conclusion & Significance: Further studies are needed in order to understand the possible association between vaccines and T1D in humans.

Keynote Forum

Silvia Martina Ferrari

University of Pisa, Italy

Keynote: Viruses and type 1 diabetes
OMICS International Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Silvia Martina Ferrari photo
Biography:

Silvia Martina Ferrari completed her Graduation in Biological Sciences in 2002 and specialized in Clinical Pathology in 2007 at University of Pisa, Italy. Her principal areas of expertise are autoimmune thyroid disorders, chemokines and cytokines, type 1 diabetes, systemic autoimmune disorders, HCV-associated thyroid disorders and thyroid cancer. Her researches have been published in more than 154 articles on international journals (HI=38). She serves as an Editorial Board Member and is Referee and Reviewer of many scientifi c international journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (also known as type 1 diabetes or T1D) is a form of diabetes mellitus resulting from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. The lack of insulin that derives from it leads to increased blood glucose. Th e classical symptoms are polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss. T1D is a multi-factorial autoimmune disease determined by the interaction of genetic, environmental and immunologic factors.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The literature about the possible association of T1D and viruses in humans has been reviewed.
 
Findings: Evidence obtained from in vitro studies and experimental animals suggest that diff erent viruses are able to modulate the development of T1D through various mechanisms, as direct beta cell lysis, molecular mimicry, by stander activation of auto-reactive T cells and loss of regulatory T cells. The strongest association among viruses and T1D involves enterovirus species, of which some strains (Coxsackie virus B) can induce or accelerate disease in animal models. In humans, the viruses that seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of T1D are Coxsackie virus, Rubella virus, Mumps virus, and Hepatitis C virus.
 
Conclusion: Viruses may directly infect and destroy pancreatic beta cells or may trigger or contribute to beta cell-specifi c autoimmunity with/without beta cell infection. However, there is no direct evidence that viruses can cause diabetes in humans, as it is diffi cult to evaluate the role of viruses in the development of T1D in humans. Large prospective cohort studies in pre-diabetic or genetically susceptible subjects and newly T1D patients are needed in order to understand viral etiology of T1D in humans.