Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 29th International Conference on Vaccines and Immunization London, UK.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Pierre A MORGON photo
Biography:

Pierre A Morgon is Chief Executive Officer of MRGN Advisors, a consultancy dedicated to the healthcare sector, and Regional Partner for Switzerland at Mérieux Développement, an evergreen investment structure focused on medical devices, in vitro diagnostics and patient management services. He is also Chairman of the Board of Virometix (developing proprietary synthetic nanoparticle platform in vaccines and immunotherapeutic drugs for viral diseases and cancer), Non-Executive Director to the Board of Theradiag (focusing on in vitro diagnostics in auto-immunity, infectious diseases and allergy) and Non-Executive Director to the Board of Eurocine Vaccines (developing intra nasal vaccines). He holds a Doctorate of Pharmacy, Master degree in Business Law and MBA.

 

Abstract:

The vaccine segment is anticipated to be one of the fastest growing one of the healthcare industry and several leading firms have stepped up vaccine investments in recent years. Unlike therapeutic agents, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals only once or very infrequently during a life time. Vaccines generate well-documented positive externalities, yet their poor awareness and acceptability among vaccine end-users may contribute to resurgence of transmissible diseases and consequently trigger governmental interventions such as mandating vaccination. In addition to technical and clinical development per the highest quality standards, bringing new vaccines to market requires carefully orchestrated programs targeting the multiple types of stakeholders along the entire value chain and addressing their respective purchasing behavioral drivers. Against a backdrop of anti-vaccination buzz and vaccine fatigue, successful global launch and sustainable usage of a vaccine requires the development of a multi-pronged strategy addressing all aspects in relation to acceptability (e.g. the motivation to immunize despite the quasi-disappearance of the disease), accessibility (e.g. supply chain services), availability (e.g. mechanisms ensuring reliability of supply) and affordability (e.g. tiered pricing policy taking country differences in per capita income into account). Leveraging novel technological advances can positively influence the ability to activate these levers successfully.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 10:50 -11:10 @ Breakout Area

Keynote Forum

Poupak Fallahi

University of Pisa, Italy

Keynote: Vaccines and type 1 diabetes

Time : 11.10-11.50

Conference Series Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Poupak Fallahi photo
Biography:

Poupak Fallahi completed her Graduation in Medicine and Surgery in 1993 and specialized in Occupational Health Medicine in 1999 at University of Pisa, Italy. Her principal areas of expertise are autoimmune thyroid disorders, type 1 diabetes, chemokines and cytokines, systemic autoimmune disorders, HCV-associated thyroid disorders, thyroid cancer and occupational medicine. Her researches have been published in more than 218 articles on international journals (HI=47). She serves as an Editorial Board Member and is Referee and Reviewer of many scientifi c international journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In predisposed subjects autoimmune reactions to vaccines can rarely be induced by molecular mimicry or bystander activation mechanisms. Th e pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is complex and derives from a combination of
genetic, hormonal, immunological, and environmental factors, and viruses seem to have a determinant role among the diff erent environmental factors.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The literature about the possible association between vaccines and T1D in humans has been reviewed.
 
Findings: The available data do not support an association between vaccines and T1D both in young adults, or children. However, evidence about this association are incomplete and not clear as several factors appear to be involved in the development of T1D. Several experimental data have suggested that vaccines could exert a protecting or aggravating effect on the occurrence of diabetes, regarding on the timing of vaccination. In adults, a study conducted in active component US military personnel did not observe a signifi cant increased
risk of T1D aft er vaccination with anthrax vaccine adsorbed, smallpox vaccine, typhoid vaccine, Hepatitis B vaccine, Measles Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, or Yellow fever vaccine. Well-designed and long-term studies about the use of vaccines and incidence of childhood diabetes are ongoing.
 
Conclusion & Significance: Further studies are needed in order to understand the possible association between vaccines and T1D in humans.

Keynote Forum

Silvia Martina Ferrari

University of Pisa, Italy

Keynote: Viruses and type 1 diabetes
Conference Series Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Silvia Martina Ferrari photo
Biography:

Silvia Martina Ferrari completed her Graduation in Biological Sciences in 2002 and specialized in Clinical Pathology in 2007 at University of Pisa, Italy. Her principal areas of expertise are autoimmune thyroid disorders, chemokines and cytokines, type 1 diabetes, systemic autoimmune disorders, HCV-associated thyroid disorders and thyroid cancer. Her researches have been published in more than 154 articles on international journals (HI=38). She serves as an Editorial Board Member and is Referee and Reviewer of many scientifi c international journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (also known as type 1 diabetes or T1D) is a form of diabetes mellitus resulting from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. The lack of insulin that derives from it leads to increased blood glucose. Th e classical symptoms are polyuria, polyphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss. T1D is a multi-factorial autoimmune disease determined by the interaction of genetic, environmental and immunologic factors.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The literature about the possible association of T1D and viruses in humans has been reviewed.
 
Findings: Evidence obtained from in vitro studies and experimental animals suggest that diff erent viruses are able to modulate the development of T1D through various mechanisms, as direct beta cell lysis, molecular mimicry, by stander activation of auto-reactive T cells and loss of regulatory T cells. The strongest association among viruses and T1D involves enterovirus species, of which some strains (Coxsackie virus B) can induce or accelerate disease in animal models. In humans, the viruses that seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of T1D are Coxsackie virus, Rubella virus, Mumps virus, and Hepatitis C virus.
 
Conclusion: Viruses may directly infect and destroy pancreatic beta cells or may trigger or contribute to beta cell-specifi c autoimmunity with/without beta cell infection. However, there is no direct evidence that viruses can cause diabetes in humans, as it is diffi cult to evaluate the role of viruses in the development of T1D in humans. Large prospective cohort studies in pre-diabetic or genetically susceptible subjects and newly T1D patients are needed in order to understand viral etiology of T1D in humans.

  • Human Vaccines against Infectious Diseases | Veterinary Vaccines | Paediatric Vaccination
Location: Bleriot 2
Speaker
Biography:

Liliya Pekova is a specialist of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology. She is Head of the Department of Infectious Diseases of Medical Faculty, Trakia University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria and a Chief of the Clinic of Infectious Diseases in the University Hospital in the same city. She has recently led a science project in the field of Viral neuro-infections with many diff erent involving specialists.

Abstract:

Introduction & Aim: Acute infl uenza-associated encephalopathy/encephalitis (IAE) in children and adults is not so common but very serious and sometimes fatal neurological complication. The purpose was to show clinical and laboratorial peculiarities in this condition and to indicate some prognostic factors.
 
Materials & Methods: In a period of three years (2014-2017) through the Clinic of Infectious diseases at University Hospital in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria seven patients with IAE were passed. They were aged between 3 and 37 years. Clinical, epidemiological, laboratorial and instrumental investigations were accomplished in all patients. The results were processed with statistical program SPSS for Windows, v. 14.
 
Results & Discussion: Clinical manifestations appeared in five patients with an initial convulsion usually within 24-72 hours after the acute onset of the disease and quantitative changes in consciousness to coma in three. There was no evidence of meningradicular irritation in any patient. Laboratory blood tests showed in three patients’ elevated levels of leucocytes and aminotransferases, high urea, glucosis and creatinine. Th e fi ndings of cerebrospinal fluid indicated albumin values from 1.0 to 3.0 g/l and increased glucose from 4.5 to 21 mmol/l. All of these three patients ended up with a fatal outcome. Their pathological outcomes detected necrotizing encephalopathy. The remaining four patients recovered completely without residual symptoms. The diagnosis was confi rmed by clinical and epidemiological data, but also by serological (ELISA) in blood investigations and virological (PCR) in autopsy material in all but one infl uenza AН3N2 virus was detected. Influenza virus strain Victoria was detected with him. All patients were treated with oseltamivir in appropriate doses. None of them were vaccinated against infl uenza.
 
Conclusion: IAE had a well-known clinical course. Some extremely elevated laboratorial changes may predict a lethal outcome. IAE was a complication which could be avoided by specific vaccine use.

Break: Lunch Break 12:55-13:55 @ RBG
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Wild koala populations continue to experience serious declines as a result of several threatening factors including: loss of habitat; motor vehicle trauma; dog attacks and; chlamydial disease. Chlamydial infections are associated with diseases ranging from ocular disease leading to blindness, as well as urinary and genital tract disease, leading to female infertility. Modeling shows that targeting chlamydial disease would have a major impact on stabilising population decline. Our previous studies have demonstrated that koalas can be safely immunized with a vaccine containing a mixture of chlamydial major outer membrane protein (MOMP) antigens combined with a single or three-dose subcutaneous regime. In our most recent, large scale, field trial of the vaccine, we vaccinated 30 koalas that were outwardly clinically healthy but either Chlamydia PCR negative or Chlamydia PCR positive, and followd them for 1-2 years to assess the protective effect of the vaccine (compared to a control group of unvaccinated koalas). We observed strong, specific and long-lasting immune responses in the vaccinated koalas; high titre antibody responses (as measured by ELISA and also in vitro neutralisation) as well as Chlamydia-specific cytokine responses (interferon-gamma and IL-17 in particular). For animals which were Chlamydia PCR positive at the time of vaccination, we observed a significant reduction in their infection PCR load (at both the ocular and urogenital tract sites). We also observed protection from progression to clinical disease in the vaccinated animals. We have also conducted a small trial to vaccinate animals which already have clinical signs of ocular disease. Instead of the normal practice of administering antibiotics (chloramphenicol, daily for 28 days, which severely disrupts the animal’s gut microbiome) we vaccinated four animals with a single dose, 3-MOMP vaccine. For all vaccinated animals, their Chlamydia PCR load decreased, often to zero, and in two animals at least, we observed a decrease in their clinical disease score. These results are promising for the future development of an effective chlamydial vaccine for use in captive as well as wild koalas.

Speaker
Biography:

Yoshinori HAYAKAWA has graduated Tokyo University, Department of Applied Physics. He received Ph.D. in Tokyo Institute of Technology. He then engaged in Boron-Neutron Therapy in Teikyo University and then Proton Radiation Beam Therapy in University of Tsukuba. He has Measured first in the world acoustic pulse generated in the patient’s body treated by pulsed proton beam. The phenomenon will be used to monitor dose distribution in patients as planed or not. He then becomes a professor in Toin University of Yokohama. He is now a part time lecturer after retirement. He is interested in researches on well-being of human life. He has developed Computer Numerals and New Abacus Numerals for improving basic education to reduce poverty. He has developed Universal Literacy Alphabet as well. He is now developing a plan to eliminate glacial period by reflecting sun light by mirrors on the moon surface and Lagrangian points of moon orbit.

Abstract:

New bird type influenza pandemic may kill 300 million people assuming the population of 7.2 millard and 20% population became ill and death rate is 20%. Especially bird flu H7N9 is the most likely candidate of pandemic. Now death rate of H7N9 patients is 40%. But if death rate become 30~20%, patients have sufficient time to transfer virus to another person. Inactive or ordinary attenuated live vaccine is too costly for people especially in developing countries. Ferret nasal mucosa is carcinated using carcinogen such as benzopyrene. Mucous cancer is easier to incubate. Bird influenza virus is attenuated by reverse genetics. The virus is marked by green fluorescent protein. This attenuated virus is sprayed to many cultured cancer cell incubation specimen. In some specimen attenuated virus will be mutated to increase in cancer cells. The increase is checked by green fluorescence. Then the virus is tested to infect ferret and then human volunteers with no serious syndrome. Virus with strongest virus titer to infect ferret is selected as seed virus of infectious attenuated live influenza vaccine. When natural outbreak of pandemic is estimated to be very near, the seed virus will be increased in incubated cancer cells by bioreactors all over the world and sprayed to vulnerable young people, e.g., soldiers, students and people in slams. Drones may be used to enhance infection, spraying in cities thin capsules including the live vaccine. Capsules are very thin to be melted at human nasal mucous membrane. Thus, basic immunity is gained by people against dangerous new influenza. The number of victims seems to be less than one thousandth compared to the situation with no infectious vaccine. The calculation assumes the number of victims with infectious attenuated live vaccine application is less than that of A/H1N1.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 15:45-16:05 @ Breakout Area

Md Jasim Uddin

International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Title: Innovative approaches for improving child immunization coverage in urban slums of Bangladesh
Speaker
Biography:

Md Jasim Uddin has completed his PhD from University of Dhaka on Management Studies (Health). His research area is health systems research and he has published around 50 articles in peer reviewed journals. He has been working as a Consultant Scientist at International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Rapid urbanization, high density of population, and low coverage of immunization in urban slums of Bangladesh call for the increased emphasis on immunization coverage for vulnerable urban poor children where spread of infection is faster. The study assessed the impact of an EPI intervention package, implemented within the existing service-delivery system, to improve the child immunization coverage in urban slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Methodology: This intervention trial used a pre and post-test design. An intervention package was tested in two urban slums. The intervention package included: (a) an extended EPI service schedule, (b) training for service providers on valid doses and management of side-effects, (c) a screening tool to identify immunization needs among clinic attendants, and (d) an EPI support group for social mobilization. Data were obtained from random sample surveys, service statistics, and qualitative interviews. Analysis of quantitative data was based on a before and after assessment of selected immunization-coverage indicators. Qualitative data were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings: Ninety-nine percent of the children were fully immunized after implementation of the interventions compared to only 43% before implementation. Antigen-wise coverage after implementation of the interventions was also significantly higher compared to before implementation. Only 1% drop-out was observed after the implementation of the interventions while it was 33% before implementation. At baseline, a significantly higher proportion of children of non-working mothers (75%) were fully immunized compared to children of working mothers (14%). Although the proportion of fully-immunized children of both non-working and working mothers was significantly higher at end line, fully-immunized children of working mothers were dramatically improved at end line (99%) compared to baseline (14%).

Conclusion & Significance: The findings suggest the effectiveness of a 'package of interventions' in improving child immunization coverage in urban slums. Therefore, the policy makers and programme managers should implement the package of successful interventions in all the slums of Bangladesh for improving the coverage of child immunization among this marginalized group of people. Other countries who are struggling from the same problem may also implement the interventions. 

Speaker
Biography:

Debaki R Howlader completed his MSc in Microbiology and joined National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (NICED), India as a Junior Research Fellow to carry out PhD in October, 2014. He is a Senior Research Fellow in the same institute since January, 2017. Currently, he is working in the Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge as a Visiting Research Scholar. His research interest is to use Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMV) from typhoidal salmonellae and to check their ability to be used as a vaccine.

Abstract:

Salmonella typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A are the leading causative agents of enteric fever which causes morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this paper, we are focusing on the development of a novel bivalent typhoidal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) based immunogen against enteric fever. We have isolated Salmonella typhi and Paratyphi A OMVs and also characterized OMVs associated antigens. Then we immunized the adult mice with three doses of our newly formulated bivalent immunogen orally (25 mg/200 ml). After three doses of oral immunization, we found our immunogen can significantly induce humoral response; LPS, Vi-polysaccharide specific serum IgG, IgA, IgM as well as induce Th1 and Th17-cell mediated immunity. We also found bivalent OMVs immunization can prevent heterologous Salmonella strains mediated systemic infection in adult mice model. We determined that the protective immune responses depend on the humoral and cell-mediated immune response. Furthermore, we have evaluated the mode of protective immune response which was carried out by anti-OMVs antibody by significantly inhibiting bacterial motility and mucin penetration. Taken together these findings suggest our bivalent immunogen could be used as a novel candidate vaccine against enteric fever.