Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 29th International Conference on Vaccines and Immunization London, UK.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Pramod Jog

Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, India

Keynote: How do we prioritize vaccines for diff erent countries?
Conference Series Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Pramod Jog photo
Biography:

Pramod Jog is Professor of Pediatrics at D.Y. Patil Medical College, Pune, India. He has been the President of Indian Academy of Pediatrics, 2016. He is standing committee member of IPA (International Pediatric Association) 2016-19, steering committee member of GAVI (CSO) 2016-19 and Associate Fellow.

Abstract:

Vaccines recommended under the National Immunization Program (NIP) are based on the promises that they will prevent the morbidity and mortality due to the illnesses that they cover, and have a high prevalence in that country. Hence, they become the first priority for any practitioner of medicine—both in public and in private sector. Sometimes, local and seasonal epidemiology will also have a bearing. Besides the burden of the disease, certain child specific conditions will also determine the priorities in vaccination. Affordability and cost of the vaccines remain the biggest challenge in deciding priorities in developing countries. The vaccine having lower cost but comparable efficacy should be preferred to enable more vaccines in one’s immunization kitty. Many ethical questions will also weigh while deciding priorities. This talk discusses role of all these issues on deciding a vaccination schedule of an individual child in office setting. Vaccination remains one of the most cost-effective preventions in the medical field. Even the cost of most expensive vaccines is less than the burden of the morbidity and mortality of the illnesses, and the cost of their treatment thereof. Every child has the right to receive all the approved, age appropriate vaccines in that country. Yet not many would be able to afford them. Therefore, the private practitioner has to prioritize on the offering of as many vaccines as possible to as many children coming to his/her facility. Designing an immunization schedule of an individual child with resource strains is indeed a daunting task. One has to prioritize various vaccines based on disease epidemiology, affordability, risk to that particular child, and also availability of affordable vaccines in the vicinity. Hence, various factors need to be considered while prioritizing the vaccines. These factors can be conveniently placed in the form of a mnemonic Nescafe which stands for need, efficacy, safety, cost, affordability, flexible situations and ethical issues.

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 10:50-11:10 @ Breakout Area
Conference Series Vaccines Summit 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yoshinori HAYAKAWA photo
Biography:

Yoshinori HAYAKAWA has graduated Tokyo University, Department of Applied Physics. He received Ph.D. in Tokyo Institute of Technology. He then engaged in Boron-Neutron Therapy in Teikyo University and then Proton Radiation Beam Therapy in University of Tsukuba. He has Measured first in the world acoustic pulse generated in the patient’s body treated by pulsed proton beam. The phenomenon will be used to monitor dose distribution in patients as planed or not. He then becomes a professor in Toin University of Yokohama. He is now a part time lecturer after retirement. He is interested in researches on well-being of human life. He has developed Computer Numerals and New Abacus Numerals for improving basic education to reduce poverty. He has developed Universal Literacy Alphabet as well. He is now developing a plan to eliminate glacial period by reflecting sun light by mirrors on the moon surface and Lagrangian points of moon orbit.

Abstract:

New influenza pandemic might kill 300 million people in the world. Ordinary vaccines are too costly for many people in developing countries. Moreover vaccines are not available in early stages of pandemic. Live attenuated H7N9 Influenza virus vaccine for ferrets using reverse genetics has been reported. They have used green fluorescent protein for vaccine. Ferret nasal mucosa is carcinized using carcinogen for easiness of incubation. This attenuated virus is sprayed to many cultured cancer cell specimen incubated. In some specimen attenuated virus will (mutated to) increase in cancer cells, checked by green fluorescence. Then the virus is tested to infect ferrets and then human volunteers without serious symptom. Virus with strongest virus titer to infect ferrets is selected as seed virus of live vaccine. The seed virus will be increased in incubated cancer cells by bioreactors all over the world and sprayed to vulnerable people, e.g., soldiers, students, people in slams, medical staffs, and people engaged in lifeline. Drones may be used to enhance infection, spraying in slams and markets thin capsules including the live vaccine. Thin capsules are melted at human nasal mucous membrane. Thus basic immunity is gained by many people against dangerous virus. Artificial pandemic against dangerous virus as H7N9, H5N1 etc., are to be created serially with few years interval. Artificial pandemic should be initiated before wild type pandemic starts. The reason is to avoid reassortment (mixture) of virus RNA and to avoid clinical and social confusion. It should not overlap with influenza season. The number of victims seems to be less than one thousands of wild type pandemic. The calculation assumes the number of victims with infectious attenuated live vaccine is less than that of A/H1N1. Similar technique cannot be used for creating biological weapon as toxic virus kill cancer cells for incubation.

  • Veterinary Vaccines | Current Research & Future Challenges | Cellular Immunology & Latest Innovations | Cancer, Malaria & TB Vaccines
Location: Bleriot 2

Session Introduction

Keshan Zhang

Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, China

Title: Maternal antibody has negative effect on foot and mouth disease vaccine immune in piglets
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Maternal antibodies are transferred from sow to piglet, it’s very effective in protecting neonates and infants pig against most infectious diseases. Vaccination of newborn piglets is problematic because of two unsolved problems: the presence of inhibitory maternal antibodies and the immature immune system of neonates pig. Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals; it leads to enormous economic loss worldwide. One of the most important measures to control and prevent FMD is the vaccine and immunity. The time point of first immune for neonates piglets is crucial in FMD immunization schedule. Researchers have reported that pig maternal antibodies can inhibit seroconversion of veterinary vaccines such as Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, pseudorabies virus, classical swine fever virus, Influenza virus. However, the effect of maternal antibody on FMD vaccine immune in piglets has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to evaluate interference effect on FMD vaccine immune with the presence of FMD maternal antibody in piglets.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Sows were inoculated FMD vaccine one month before birth. Piglets which on 30(A group), 43(B group), 56(C group), 77(D group) days old were grouped, and each group had 20 piglets. ALL the piglets were vaccinated with FMD vaccine and serum from anterior vena cava blood were collected and numbered.

Results: Serums from all the piglets were gathered on 28 days after FMD immunization. FMD antibodies were detected with liquid phase blocking (LBP) ELISA method.

Conclusion & Significance: Analysis of antibody data of FMD indicated that the higher maternal antibody level of FMD in piglets, the greater negative effect on FMD vaccine immunity. It is very important to choose the first FMD immunization time point of piglets in the presence of maternal antibodies.

Speaker
Biography:

J Santiago Mejia is a Research Scientist interested in the development of solutions to medical problems, in particular those caused by arthropod-borne pathogens. He is passionate about scientific discovery and new perspectives into complex problems. His work characterizing the immune and inflammatory response after the bite of hematophagous arthropods lead him realize that while exposure to the bite of infected arthropods represent a health risk, exposure to the bite of healthy arthropods might be essential to human health. The complete removal from human dwellings of hematophagous arthropods might represent an eco-pathological process associated with an increased risk of chronic non-communicable diseases. Under this perspective it will be necessary to explore strategies to ensure that residents of intervened areas get access to saliva from laboratory-reared pathogen-free arthropods.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Development of vaccines to prevent diseases caused by arthropod-borne pathogens remains, with few exceptions, an elusive goal. This is in part due to the complexity of the immune evasion mechanisms they deploy to thrive in vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. A promising alternative is to target antigens present in the saliva that hematophagous arthropods deliver, along with pathogens, at the bite site. One major advantage of this approach is that molecular structures preserved during the evolution of arthropods can be incorporated in the development of pan-arthropod vaccines. One additional advantage is that natural exposure to saliva from both infected and non-infected arthropods can boost transmission-blocking immunity.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: We used the BluePort tissue platform, a well-vascularized and macrophage-rich compartment, as tool to induce and evaluate anti-salivary immunity. Saliva from three species of hematophagous arthropods, Lutzomyia longipalpis, Ochlerotatus triseriatus and Ixodes scapularis, was used to study the cross-reactive immunity generated, and lectins and enzymes used to study N-linked glycans as potential inductors of this immunity.

Findings: The BluePort tissue platform is a lymph-node type structure that can be used to accelerate the acquisition of cross-reactive anti-salivary immunity. Drastic differences in the cell inflammatory profile detected in naïve and immune animals strongly suggest that the BluePort vaccination portal facilitates the induction of strong TH-2 type responses, and that allergenic structure, such as arthropod N-linked glycans, might be involved in the inducting of cross-reactive immunity.

Conclusion & Significance: It is possible to induce cross-reactive immunity towards salivary glycoproteins using the BluePort as vaccination portal, it remains to be determined whether the immunity induced block pathogen transmission.

Pramod Jog

Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, India

Title: Immunology as applied to vaccination
Speaker
Biography:

Pramod Jog is Professor of Pediatrics at D.Y. Patil Medical College, Pune, India. He has been the President of Indian Academy of Pediatrics, 2016. He is standing committee member of IPA (International Pediatric Association) 2016-19, steering committee member of GAVI (CSO) 2016-19 and Associate Fellow.

Abstract:

The main aim of the immune system is to recognize self from foreign and to eliminate the harmful foreign substances from the body. This is done through recognition of antigens on the foreign substances or organisms. The response mounted by the body is called immune response and it consists of producing either proteins called antibodies as in humoral response or specific cells called cellular response. The antigen (Ag) is presented to the Antigen Presenting Cell (APC). The Ag-APC complex reaches the lymph node and stimulates either CD4 (helper) or CD8 (cytotoxic) T cell. The CD4 T cell produces either Th1 or Th2 cells. Th2 cells stimulate B cells to produce either plasma cells or memory cells. Plasma cells produce antibodies. The presentation will discuss the dynamics of antibody production; primary response, secondary response, immunological basis of conjugated vaccines etc.

Break: Lunch Break 13:05-14:05 @ RBG
Speaker
Biography:

Yanelys Morera Diaz was graduated at the Biology Faculty, Havana University. She has been working since as a staff scientist at the Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Havana, Cuba. She has worked in the Cancer Immunotherapy Group at the Biomedical Research Area in the fields of Molecular Biology and Immunology, specifically in the development of a therapeutic vaccine candidate for cancer. Yanelys has published several articles, is author of five National awards of the Sciences Academy of Cuba and is author of three Health National Awards. She received a Master in Sciences degree in Biotechnology (CIGB) in 2010 and got her Ph .D. in Biological Sciences from the University of Havana in 2013. For this work she received the National Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award. Currently, Yanelys Morera is the head of Cancer Immunotherapy Laboratory and is devoted to the study of the immunological response of cancer patients vaccinated with HeberSaVax.

Abstract:

HeberSaVaX is a novel therapeutic cancer vaccine designed to produce an immune response against VEGF, with the development of antibodies that block the interaction of VEGF and its receptors, and reduce the bioavailability of this growth factor, thus inhibiting the pro-angiogenic and immune suppressive effects of this molecule. Also, the vaccine elicits cytotoxic T cells that directly kill tumor and other stroma cells that produce VEGF. The vaccine uses a recombinant modified human VEGF as antigen (CIGB-247) and has been tested mainly with two adjuvants: very small sized particles (VSSP) derived from Neisseria meningitidis OMP, and aluminum phosphate. After preclinical studies, two Phase I clinical trials were done where safety, tolerance, and immunogenicity of HeberSaVax were studied in patients with advanced solid tumors. Surviving individuals were eligible to receive off-trial voluntary re-immunizations until death, intolerance, marked disease progression, or patient’s withdrawal of consent. The present work is focus in the immunological follow up of these surviving patients after 1 to 4 years of immunizations, without additional oncological treatments. One of the most outstanding findings in this active immunization follow up study is the long-term safety profile of HeberSaVax vaccination. Herein we show that long-term immunization was safe and most of the patients continue to produce anti-VEGF IgG antibodies that block VEGF/VEGF receptor 2 (KDR) interactions. VEGF/KDR positive blocking activity was stable, and in some cases increased with re-immunization. Cells from chronically immunized patients secreted gamma-IFN after in vitro stimulation; in some patients, this response could be classified as CD8+ specific.  Our results indicate that long term immunization should continue to be a relevant as part of the HeberSaVax vaccination strategy, and highlight the importance of continuing the clinical development program of this novel cancer therapeutic vaccine candidate.

 

Break: Networking and Refreshments Break 15:20-15:40 @ Breakout Area